Dear Stephen,
I am an admirer of your books and your method of transmission of knowledge. I read many books on herbal treatment, but yours are unique. I am interested in your books especially those about medicinal plants. I know that one of the principal planes on which you are focused is treatment protocol for lyme and co-infections transmitted by ticks. I also know you looking for new herbs for these diseases. I wonder if in the future you could concentrate on medicinal mushrooms because it seems to me that you give them little attention. I read a recent book by Robert Rogers “The Fungal Pharmacy” in which Rogers is focused on medicinal fungus from the group polipores. According to current research it is the most promising group of fungi in terms of immunostimulatory, antibiotic and antimicrobal effects. I know that very few antibacterial herbs act systemically, on the whole body; most act locally. I know that in vivo and in vitro often do not coincide but this is a clue worth examining. The most difficult co-infection to treat with herbs is bartonella. Do you know whether the Verruga peruana infection caused by Bartonella bacilliformis is effectively treated with herbs in South America? Maybe this is the right track in finding a cure for bartonella – South American herbs used by native people of the rainforest to treat Verruga peruana? Greetings from Polish fans and herbalists!
Stephen’s response:
I have been working on this and a book on bartonella and mycoplasma is due out, at this best guess in spring 2013 from Inner Traditions. I do think that reishi is a good medicinal mushroom and there are others. Some are antibiotic as well and antiviral (as is reishi). In my new edition of herbal antibiotics I do look at 5 potent antibacterial herbs that are broadly systemic, just like pharmaceuticals. The field is improving and you are right, it is time to get much more sophisticated with it all. Thanks for your comments.
Stephen

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